Election 2016

Credit Photo: Andrew Malone (Flickr)

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Talk to voters across the country about President Trump's first 100 days in office and a few things become abundantly clear:

His supporters — those who turned out in force and voted for him — still overwhelmingly love him.

His detractors — and they are many, given that Trump failed to win the popular vote — are still shocked by his election and appalled by his behavior.

He has lost support, particularly among moderates and independent voters. That's a big reason that polls give him the lowest approval rating of any modern president this soon after taking office.

President Trump starts the second hundred days of his administration Sunday with a perhaps unwelcome benchmark: fewer appointees in place than any of his recent predecessors.

Only a fraction of the hundreds of key jobs the Trump administration needs to fill have been nominated and confirmed by the Senate.

From the car seat, the toddler, almost three years old, asked his parents what we were doing. "We're here to learn our history, your family's history," his father said from the driver's seat.

The War On Coal In Southern Illinois

15 hours ago
War on Coal
Bill Healy/WBEZ

Last summer, WBEZ reporter Dan Weissmann traveled to the Old King Coal Festival in West Frankfort, a small town in southern Illinois. (The area produces so much coal, boosters call southern Illinois the Saudi Arabia of coal.) 

With coal at the center of the climate change battle, some people from around West Frankfort pulled together an army of sorts to take up their part in that fight. Weissmann attended one of their rallies in June.

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

What happened at the Capitol this week?

No Teacher Pay Raise Bill Passed

Lawmakers did not pass a teacher pay raise bill, despite both the House and Senate saying they want to pass a measure.

Thursday was the deadline for bills to have passed both chambers, except for legislation that comes from the Joint Committees on Appropriations and Budget.

Sen. Jason Smalley, R-Stroud, who was supposed to introduce a bill on the Senate floor that would give teachers a $6000 raise over three years, did not introduce the bill.

To legally justify its military actions against the Islamic State, the U.S. has relied on a piece of 2001 legislation, written years before the extremist group came into existence.

Now 46 representatives from both parties say in a letter to Speaker Paul Ryan that it's time for Congress to "immediately begin a serious debate" on authorization for the use military force against the Islamic State.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World Views: April 28, 2017

Apr 28, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss tensions with North Korea, and the upcoming election in France between Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron. 

Then, Suzette talks with geographer David Lopez-Carr about areas of the world that are most vulnerable to climate change.  

Putting together a march on the National Mall is a demanding task, to put it mildly. And the organizers of the Women's March only had two months to put together an event that quickly grew from a Facebook post to a worldwide phenomenon.

"I think what's really interesting is we didn't necessarily have a lot of time to think about next steps," said activist Carmen Perez.

Pages