Melissa Mohr

In light of the current Figge exhibition, Edouard Duval Carrié: Endless Flight, Claire and Melissa explore the topic of Haitian art with Haitian artist Edouard Duval-Carrié and Caribbean art scholar, Dr. Alfredo Rivera of Grinnell College. 

Lacy Scarmana

This is the complete audio from the Rainbow Coalition panel held at the Augustana Teaching Museum of Art on August 30, 2017. 

Courtesy of Daniel Tucker

In this episode, we switch things up a bit, and Melissa talks to Claire about the Augustana Teaching Museum of Art's current exhibition, Organize Your Own: the Politics and Poetics of Self-Determination Movements. 

Urban Exposure

After a summer hiatus, Claire and Melissa jump back into The Gallery Gap with an interview of Quad Citizens Gaye Shannon Burnett and Jon Burnett regarding their summer film program, Urban Exposure.

Kara Walker's artwork The Emancipation Approximation is on view at the Figge until August 27. This series of 27 silkscreen prints features the provocative silhouettes for which Walker is known. 

Courtesy of Jefferson Pinder

In the second part of a two-episode conversation about art and race in the Quad Cities, Claire and Melissa continue talking with Chicago-based artist Jefferson Pinder. 

Courtesy of Jefferson Pinder

In the first part of of a two-episode conversation about art and race in the Quad Cities, Claire and Melissa speak with Chicago-based artist Jefferson Pinder. 

Claire Hedden, artist workshop at Augustana College, 7 April 2017.
Tori Charnetzki / Augustana Photo Bureau

Claire and Melissa honor the mothers in their lives by considering the perennial question of balance, and in this case, balance between being both an artist and a mother.

In this episode, Melissa and Claire discuss a couple of recent films that grapple with the aftermath of WWII and the Holocaust, and pick up where they left off in their conversation with Dr. Jonathan Petropoulos. 

Rose Valland and Edith Standen inspecting a statue at Wiesbaden Collecting Point, 1946 May 24 / unidentified photographer. Thomas Carr Howe papers, 1932-1984.
Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

In observance of Yom HaShoah, Claire and Melissa discuss the importance of remembering the Holocaust, and begin a conversation with Dr. Jonathan Petropoulos, professor of European History at Claremont McKenna College, about how Nazi looting of artwork was a way for the Nazis to dehumanize people. 

Pages