Election 2016

Credit Photo: Andrew Malone (Flickr)

President Obama struck a somber tone, remembering the late-Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia as a "towering legal mind" who influenced a generation, but made it clear, he intends to replace him.

"I plan to fulfill my constitutional responsibilities to nominate a successor in — due time," Obama said. "There will be plenty of time for me to do so, and for the Senate to fulfill its responsibility to give that person a fair hearing and a timely vote."

Get Ready For A Fight To Replace Scalia

Feb 13, 2016

Justice Antonin Scalia loved a good fight.

So it's only fitting that news of his death at age 79 ignited an immediate and partisan battle over who might take his place on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Einstein Saw Space Move, Long Before We Could Hear It

Feb 13, 2016

Here we are in an election year — once again asking the great see-into-the-future question in politics — who will be the next president?

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From NPR Ed Digital Producer and Editor Elissa Nadworny:

As the field of candidates running for president narrows, what happens to the many dedicated campaign staffers who are suddenly out of a job?

Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd asks Vincent Harris, who was the chief digital strategist for Senator Rand Paul’s presidential campaign. Harris has worked on a number of other campaigns as well, including Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich in 2012 and Mike Huckabee in 2007.

5 Takeaways From The Democratic Debate

Feb 12, 2016

In Thursday night's Democratic debate, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders — each with one nominating contest victory — looked ahead to the upcoming primaries in Nevada and South Carolina. Here are a few of the big takeaways from the debate.

1. A focus on African-American issues

Thursday's debate may have been in Wisconsin, but the candidates seemed to be looking ahead to South Carolina. In their opening statements, both Clinton and Sanders nodded to issues that concern African-American voters.

Hillary Clinton may have suffered a big defeat in Tuesday night’s New Hampshire primary election. Going by the number of delegates she gained though, she came out in much better shape. Both Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who won with a 22-point lead, walked away even, with 15 delegate votes each.

That’s left some supporters scratching their heads asking how that is possible. The answer is “superdelegates.”

As the Republican primary moves to South Carolina, political observers are predicting that the race could get nasty in the state that historically plays a major role in choosing the party's nominee.

"South Carolina is brutal. It's bare-knuckle. It is the toughest of tough political environments to play in," says Hogan Gidley, a former director of the South Carolina Republican Party.

After a razor-thin victory in the Iowa caucuses, and a double-digit loss to Bernie Sanders in the New Hampshire primary, Hillary Clinton is looking to South Carolina for a big win later this month. And she's counting on strong black support in that state to give her a definitive victory.

The Problems Plaguing Election Polls

Feb 6, 2016

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