All Things Considered

Monday thru Friday, 4:00 - 7:00 PM

Since 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by over 13 million people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special — sometimes quirky — features.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

To learn more about the recent celebrity photo hack, Melissa Block speaks with Matthew Green of Johns Hopkins University. They discuss how the photos might have been obtained, as well as how you can protect your own material saved to the cloud.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Tom Hanks' love affair with typewriters began in the 1970s, with his first proper typewriter — a Hermes 2000. Typewriters are "beautiful works of art," he tells NPR's Audie Cornish. "And I've ended up collecting them from every ridiculous source possible."

Hanks admits he started his collection when he had a "little excess cash" but, he points out, it's "better to spend it on $50 typewriters than some of the other things you can blow show-business money on."

Sounds From The First Day Of School

Sep 2, 2014

The day after Labor Day is traditionally the end of summer break and the start of the school year. But for students in many parts of the country, the school year has already started.

Whether you're struggling to find your classroom or remember your locker combination, the first day is a big one for students, teachers and families.

With millions of children headed back to school, we asked reporters from member stations around the country to bring us the sounds of that first day:

Two U.S. news organizations, CNN and the Associated Press, were granted interviews with three men detained by North Korean authorities. To learn more about why, and what North Korea hopes to gain from the publicity, Melissa Block talks with Georgetown professor Victor Cha, the former director for Asian Affairs at the National Security Council.

Golf Course Provides Oasis For Low-Income Kids

Sep 1, 2014

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

CORNISH: All summer, dozens of lower-income kids in Providence, Rhode Island learned golf. They spent their days on a nine-hole course, an oasis in a gritty neighborhood.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's hard to comprehend the toll Sri Lanka's civil war took on the South Asian country. The United Nations estimates that between 80,000 and 100,000 people lost their lives in the conflict — all on an island just slightly larger than West Virginia.

Ethnic tensions between two main ethnic groups in Sri Lanka — the majority Sinhalese and minority Tamils — simmered through the '60s and '70s. The civil war officially began in 1983 and continued until 2009.

If there's a Mozart of garage rock, it's Ty Segall. He's put out at least a dozen albums of face-melting, critic-adored low-fi rock, in the style of bands like The Troggs or The Stooges — not to mention his work with other bands and in other styles.

But his newest album, Manipulator, is different: more produced and polished. Segall came to NPR West to talk about the album with NPR's Arun Rath — and play a few songs for us.

Hear the conversation at the audio link.

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