Education

Education

The contract for the superintendent of Davenport schools has been extended. Monday night, the board of education approved an extension for Art Tate to June 30, 2019. Tate is continuing his practice of not accepting a raise in his salary.  

Bridgepoint Education

The former owner of Ashford University in Clinton is in trouble. Monday the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) announced it will take action against the for-profit company, Bridgepoint Education, for illegal student lending practices. 

Rock Island School District

Despite problems with the state, the schools in Rock Island are doing a good job educating their students. That was the message this week from Superintendent Mike Oberhaus during his annual State of the Schools Address to members of the Rock Island Kiwanis and Rotary clubs. 

Oberhaus says the schools are implementing new programs and adding new classes, even as the state budget crisis drags on and on. And doing it at a lower cost than many other districts in Illinois.

Credit Muscatine Community College

Muscatine Community College is now $150,000 closer to bringing its 40-year-old library into the 21st century. This week, the college announced a donation from Kent Corporation will help make it possible to start construction on Loper Hall next spring. 

WVIK Staff

One Augustana College student spent his summer mapping out what areas of Scott County are at the highest risk for lead contamination. Today, senior Tanner Osing presented his findings-- the first step in a series of projects aimed at eliminating lead paint exposure in the area. 

A former member of Congress and President Obama's cabinet will visit Augustana College. On Tuesday Ray LaHood will present this year's Ellwood F. Curtis Family Lecture in Public Affairs entitled "Seeking Bipartisanship: My Life in Politics."

He represented Illinois' 18th District in Congress from 1995 to 2009, then served as Secretary of Transportation from 2009 to 2013.

Funding for renovating both campuses will be considered Thursday night by trustees of Black Hawk College. 

The vice president for finance and administration, Steve Frommelt, is recommending the college borrow 32 million dollars for a variety of building and infrastructure improvements.

Frommelt says bonds would probably be sold in December, for eight years, with an interest rate of 2.5 per cent. And the bond issue would not add to the college's current tax levy. 

Just as the new school year gets started, the Rock Island school board is nearly finished preparing a budget. Tuesday night, the board gave its tentative approval to a 63.8 million dollar budget, with final approval in a month.

Chief Financial Officer, Bob Beckwith, says the one major change from last year is state aid - the governor has promised state aid for the coming year will be fully funded instead of being pro-rated as it was last year at 92 per cent.

Health Care at City Hall

Aug 23, 2016

Starting next month, employees of Augustana College will get many of their health care needs taken care of at Rock Island city hall. Monday night the city council approved a one-year agreement with the college to use the city's Wellness Center. 

Rock Island human resources director, John Thorson, says the walk-in clinic opened seven years ago for employees, but has since added pre-employment physicals, drug testing, and workmen's compensation claims. And so far it's more than paid for itself.

It's staffed by a nurse practitioner and l.p.n, both employees of Genesis Health System, who take care of cuts, sprains, blood tests, and drug prescriptions.

WVIK News / WVIK News

On Thursday, Augustana College welcomed 750 first year students during its annual move in day. But one of the new campus residents is definitely not a recent high school graduate.

Doctor Kathy Jakielski is chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and the first participant in the new, faculty-in-residence program. 

Living in Swanson Commons, Jakielski will act as a mentor for students, especially sophomores. She says younger and older college students get a lot of special attention, but not those in their second year. 

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